Riding a Bike through the Sky in Okayama (Washuzan Highland)

After hitch-hiking around Okayama and seeing all of the major sights it had to offer, I decided to make my way to Washuzan Highland so I could ride the “most terrifying rollercoaster in all of Japan” (that’s really not so terrifying).  Washuzan Highland is a Brazilian-themed amusement park about an hour from Okayama Station.  The park has everything from roller coasters to swimming pools to petting zoos.  Because it’s located in the countryside of Japan, it has a huge amount of attractions but not nearly as many tourists as other amusement parks.  With the tropical plants, Brazilian performers, and the vibrant atmosphere, I really did feel like I was in a different country here!

The terrifying rollercoaster, called the “SkyCycle”, is actually a pedal-powered roller bike that’s extremely high up in the sky.  Although I didn’t find it scary, the fear likely stems from the fact that it’s not automated like other rollercoasters; the bike is entirely in your control and you go around at your own pace.  Looking down might cause panic for those who are afraid of heights, but this is a great ride for people like me who love adventure.  The ride is only about a minute long but you get an awesome view of Okayama Prefecture and Shikoku Island from it:

I was a little disappointed that the ride wasn’t a bit longer, but I understand that people may get scared over time if it were.  The bike has two seats but you can ride it alone.  I rode it twice so I could experience it from both the inward and outward seats.  The outward seat is definitely more thrilling because it faces the edge and you can feel the motion of the turns more.  Though it looks a bit dangerous from all of the media exposure, SkyCycle is completely safe because each chair has a seat belt, so you don’t have to worry about falling off.  You should be careful of dropping your camera though!

After surviving the most terrifying rollercoaster, I decided to go swimming for a while in the pool.  It’s not very deep but it’s extremely refreshing on a hot day in August!  Next I did some rollerskating at the roller rink.  I specifically remember that the song Cookie by banvox started playing on a loudspeaker, and I picked up the pace.  It was really cool to hear one of his rare older songs played in his home prefecture!  By that point I was exhausted, so I bought a melon and hung out at the petting zoo.  I enjoyed seeing the white hens and hamster tree.  I ate some nice egg sushi from a place nearby as well (the tamago sushi here is ginormous).  Though this happened nearly three years ago, I still remember what an exhilarating experience this was!

Unfortunately I didn’t take many pictures of the park, but trust me it’s worth riding the SkyCycle for this view:

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I may come back here again with my GoPro if I have time in the future.  If you have the time, consider checking out Okayama!  It’s such an under-rated city and has much for you to discover.

Access

303-1 Shimotsuifukiage, Kurashiki, Okayama 711-0926

Admission Fee: 2800 yen (worth it because there’s hardly any wait time for the rides)

A Ninja Village & Various Amusement Parks Around Nagoya (Part 1)

Earlier this year I wrote about the Floral Oasis amusement park I visited in Aichi Prefecture, so today I’d like to highlight 3 of my other recommended day trips from Nagoya: Legoland, Nagashima Spa Land, and the Ninja Village in Iga.

Nagoya is a seriously underrated city because its central location makes it the ideal place to explore surrounding prefectures.  You can easily access Mie and Gifu by using the JR lines and also can get to Kyoto and Osaka by bus or shinkansen.  There is a lot of nature, hotsprings, and obscure amusement parks that can be found by venturing to the outskirts of Aichi and beyond.  I’ve definitely had my fair share of adventures here.

Legoland Japan Resort

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Everything is awesome.

Legoland Japan is a relatively new theme park that opened in April 2017 making it only 3 years old of today.  I’ve been to many Legolands in the US, but I had never been to a Legoland Amusement Park until August 2017 shortly after this park opened.  Originally this park was criticized for its high admission fee (4600 yen), but from my experience it’s worth the money.  A lot of work went into constructing this park and its intricate attractions.  Unlike other amusement parks in Japan, it’s quite spacious and there was almost no waiting time even for the most popular rides even though we went on a weekend.  As a kid who used to play with Legos and construct anime characters with them, being here in Japan was absolutely surreal.

My favorite attraction was the Submarine because you dive into an underwater ecosystem constructed of Legos and real fish and sharks!  I was impressed to have such a thrilling experience here because it reminded me a lot of Disney Sea.  There is also another attraction you can ride with boats equipped water guns!  Even though this isn’t a water park, it had a lot of attractions that are well-suited for the hot days of summer.  The Lego-shaped fries are also worth trying!  There is also an awesome recreation of the major cities in Japan and Mt. Fuji built with (you guessed it) Legos.  This is undoubtedly the biggest Lego display in Japan:

Though I would rank this as one of the top amusement parks in Japan, the main con of Legoland is that is it is mostly aimed at families—the roller coasters aren’t that thrilling and about half of the rides are designed for kids.  However, after living in Japan longterm I’ve really come to appreciate this place.  Maybe my childhood nostalgia is part of the factor, but I liked the creativity that was put into this park.  The good news is that it has expanded once since I’ve visited, and has the potential to add new attractions in the future (much like a real Lego town).  Coming here was worth it for the aesthetic experience.

Access

455-8605 Aichi, Nagoya, Minato Ward, Kinjofuto, 2 Chome−2−1

Entrance Fee: 4600 yen

Nagashima Spa Land

Nagashima Spa Land is an amusement park combined with a hotspring—the Japanese dream.  Unlike Legoland, it actually has some really thriller rides.  The Steel Dragon 2000 is the longest roller coaster in the world so it’s worth visiting just for that factor!  My biggest issue with amusement parks in Japan is that I feel like they are too small for the large amount of visitors and that the rides are not adrenaline-filled enough.  However, Nagashima Spa Land and Fuji Q Highland impressed me with the intensity of their rides.  There are non-thriller roller coasters and attractions for children here as well.

I spent a lot of time in the hotspring which explains the lack of pictures, but I did come back out for the fireworks show at night.  The park has limited attractions but it’s definitely worth a day trip for the Steel Dragon 2000.  If you combine the amusement portion with a trip to the hotspring, then you can definitely make this a full day experience.  Like Legoland, the waiting times for rides are not so bad.  The downside is a lot of surrounding schools take field trips here, so be sure to avoid Japanese holidays if you come.

Access

333 Nagashimacho Urayasu, Kuwana, Mie 511-1192

Entrance Fee: 4100 yen for unlimited rides / 1600 yen pay per ride (100 yen-300 yen)*

*I honestly recommend paying per ride because likely you will just want to ride the roller coasters.

In my next article I will be talking about the Ninja Village in Iga I visited.  Please see Part 2 next.

Exploring Aichi’s Floral Oasis: Laguna Ten Bosch in the Winter (Japan)

A few weeks after returning to Japan from my aesthetic adventures in Taiwan, I decided to go to Nagoya City and attend an event called Touch & Go that some of my favorite artists were playing at.  Before getting boozed up and meeting friends, I wanted to explore somewhere that I had never been to before within the area.  Since most of Nagoya’s major attractions can been seen in 2-3 days and I had already seen them all, I decided to go somewhere on the outskirts of Aichi prefecture that was still on the way there from Tokyo.  My research led me to an amusement park named Laguna Ten Bosch (also called Lagunasia).  Not wanting to miss out on yet another aesthetic adventure, I decided to arrive around 5pm so I could catch the winter light shows and practice night photography with my GoPro.  I was not disappointed by the beautiful floral displays and flashing neon lights:

About Laguna Ten Bosch/Lagunasia

Lagunasia is a amusement park/waterpark/spa that is geared towards younger ages but has attractions that everyone can enjoy.  What caught my attention specifically is its brilliant winter illuminations.  Since I have lived in Japan for over 4 years now, I have already seen a large variety of what this country has to offer, but I had never seen illuminations in Nagoya before.  During the winter season, the outdoor waterpark is transformed into a brilliant display of Christmas decorations and lights that produce a mirror-like effect when they flicker at night:

I was amazed to see the different flowers that were in bloom during this time of year (which was January)!  While walking to the garden area shown in the video above, I walked on a transparent bridge where I could see flowers planted below my feet.  It truly was a unique experience.  I saw a cosplayer doing a photoshoot here, so I knew I had come at the right time!  Most of the light shows start around 6pm and last until the park’s closure at 9pm.  You can see detailed information regarding the light shows on their official website.

Access & Entrance Fees

Compared to other amusement parks in Japan, entrance to Lagunasia is actually quite affordable.  Admission only is around $20 USD, and $40 if you want unlimited rides.  Because I have been to so many amusement parks already, I opted to pay the cheapest option for entrance only.  There are a number of roller coasters, bumper cars, and water rides that looked fun, but in the winter I think it’s best to go the cheapest route since not all attractions are open.  I was able to get a discounted nightpass as well (I believe the price changes with the season because it is not listed on their website, but I am unsure).

To get here from Tokyo takes approximately 2 hours and 25 mins.  I rode the Tokaido-Sanyo Shinkansen to Toyohashi Station.  Then I took a local train to Mikawa-Otsuka Station.  The ride was very easy compared to other trips that I have done, and getting to where I needed to be in Nagoya only took an hour and a half on local trains.

See the Access page of the Laguna Ten Bosch website for more information.

I thought it was funny that random cutouts of Boku no Hero Academia were placed around the park.  It must have been part of a collaboration, but it was very subtle.

So is it worth it?

I give this amusement park an overall positive review because a lot of effort was put into the 3D mapping and light shows here.  However, unless you really love amusement parks or have extra time to kill in Nagoya, I would first recommend checking out Universal Studios in Osaka or Lego Land (also near Nagoya).  I will review these in separate posts when I have time.  These places both have more attractions and are easier to access than Lagunasia, so they are better to see first in my opinion.

If you have been living in Japan for a while like me and are looking for something new to see, or are close to the Nagoya area, then this is it!  This is the perfect day trip or getaway from Nagoya City.  The lines are minimal here–you can easily ride all the rides you want within a few minutes.  The illuminations are great for practicing photography and I had a lot of fun experiencing them.  You may find yourself getting bored if you come too early, so I would recommend coming here in the afternoon so you can catch the light shows (the winter seems the most elaborate, but they change year-round).

I would come here again with a friend if the opportunity presented itself~

A Magical Day Trip to Moomin Valley

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Metsä Village from the Moomin series in Hanno, Japan.

Last week I took a day trip to the magical fairytale-like village of Metsä in Moomin Valley, Hanno, Japan, with a few of my friends visiting from outside the country.  Based on the popular comic strip and animated series created by Finnish author Tove Jansson, this friendly Moomin-themed park offers a day of relaxation, theater shows, and fun exhibits for visitors.  Though I have lived in Japan for over 4 years now, this is one of the few theme parks I had yet to visit because it is roughly an hour and a half outside of central Tokyo.  Though it was a bit of a long journey, I had a lot of fun venturing through this valley with my friends because it captures the spirit of the series.

Like in the series, the big blue Moominhouse is the first thing you’ll see once you enter the park!  There are shows performed every 2 hours with dancing mascots, and many shops and restaurants you can enter.  We ordered the following food at the cafe and were very impressed with the taste.  Both the rice and latte art iced coffee were amazing!

My favorite park of Moomin Valley was the museum with multiple floors and interactive technology.  There are a lot of animated exhibits you can see and play with here, as well as a maze that looks like a story book.  I had a lot of fun getting lost in it and meeting all of the different Moomin characters:

Overall I thinking coming here was worth the experience, but I was a little disappointed that there weren’t any amusement rides.  However, if you are a fan of the series, or if you have lived in Japan for a while and are looking for a different experience, I would recommend checking it out.  Moomin Valley combines both nature and technology with makes it a memorable trip.

Pros:

  • Only 1500 yen entrance fee (very cheap compared to other theme parks)
  • Beautiful scenery and not very crowded
  • A great combination of nature and technology

Cons:

  • Targeted at younger children and families
  • Additional fees required to enter some attractions
  • No rides like in other amusement parks (not very action-packed)

Here is some footage I caught of the Moomin theater show.  My friends and I were extremely impressed when they started riding the hover boards):

For more information, please see the Moomin Valley Park website.